A place with a little bit of everything and a whole lot of nothing.

21, writer, future teacher, nerdfighter, fangirl of Doctor Who, Harry Potter, Castle, New Girl, Chris Pine, Death Cab for Cutie, Florence and the Machine, and an assortment of other things. Pretty pictures are reblogged frequently and the alt-click function for rblogging gets abused so things tend not to get tagged. Sorry, not sorry. Enjoy your stay. Feel free to leave an ask for queries or a conversation.

(Source: margahery)


Posted on September 1 with 7,352 notes via goodshipgoodwood Reblog

psyfucks:

respect existence or expect resistance

DAMN SON


Posted on September 1 with 121,827 notes via goodshipgoodwood Reblog

(Source: loveatomb)


Posted on September 1 with 34,152 notes via david-tennants-little-fangirl Reblog

mysharona1987:

A batch of wonderful book dedications.


Posted on August 17 with 28,838 notes via thesansasnark Reblog
"Should parents read their daughter’s texts or monitor her online activity for bad language and inappropriate content?"

ghostflo:

daeranilen:

daeranilen:

daeranilen:

Earlier today, I served as the “young woman’s voice” in a panel of local experts at a Girl Scouts speaking event. One question for the panel was something to the effect of, "Should parents read their daughter’s texts or monitor her online activity for bad language and inappropriate content?"

I was surprised when the first panelist answered the question as if it were about cyberbullying. The adult audience nodded sagely as she spoke about the importance of protecting children online.

I reached for the microphone next. I said, “As far as reading your child’s texts or logging into their social media profiles, I would say 99.9% of the time, do not do that.”

Looks of total shock answered me. I actually saw heads jerk back in surprise. Even some of my fellow panelists blinked.

Everyone stared as I explained that going behind a child’s back in such a way severs the bond of trust with the parent. When I said, “This is the most effective way to ensure that your child never tells you anything,” it was like I’d delivered a revelation.

It’s easy to talk about the disconnect between the old and the young, but I don’t think I’d ever been so slapped in the face by the reality of it. It was clear that for most of the parents I spoke to, the idea of such actions as a violation had never occurred to them at all.

It alarms me how quickly adults forget that children are people.

Apparently people are rediscovering this post somehow and I think that’s pretty cool! Having experienced similar violations of trust in my youth, this is an important issue to me, so I want to add my personal story:

Around age 13, I tried to express to my mother that I thought I might have clinical depression, and she snapped at me “not to joke about things like that.” I stopped telling my mother when I felt depressed.

Around age 15, I caught my mother reading my diary. She confessed that any time she saw me write in my diary, she would sneak into my room and read it, because I only wrote when I was upset. I stopped keeping a diary.

Around age 18, I had an emotional breakdown while on vacation because I didn’t want to go to college. I ended up seeing a therapist for - surprise surprise - depression.

Around age 21, I spoke on this panel with my mother in the audience, and afterwards I mentioned the diary incident to her with respect to this particular Q&A. Her eyes welled up, and she said, “You know I read those because I was worried you were depressed and going to hurt yourself, right?”

TL;DR: When you invade your child’s privacy, you communicate three things:

  1. You do not respect their rights as an individual.
  2. You do not trust them to navigate problems or seek help on their own.
  3. You probably haven’t been listening to them.

Information about almost every issue that you think you have to snoop for can probably be obtained by communicating with and listening to your child.

Part of me is really excited to see that the original post got 200 notes because holy crap 200 notes, and part of me is really saddened that something so negative has resonated with so many people.

the not listening thing is SO IMPORTANT. my parents threatened to take away my phone and computer to find out about my feelings because i “wouldn’t” talk to them about it. it took my therapist to convince them that i had been trying to tell them exactly what was happening but they just didn’t listen to me when i said it.


Posted on August 17 with 56,775 notes via lizardvvizard Reblog

arthur:

patsy:

lancelot:

galahad:

arthur:

CAMELOT

CAMELOT

CAMELOT

its only a model

shh


Posted on August 14 with 15,581 notes via coooooooooooooorvo Reblog

saxas:

compasswaters:

lavender brown gets more hate for how she handles unrequited romantic feelings than snape does and i find that incredibly disturbing

Also Cho Chang gets more hate for crying and grieving over the death of her boyfriend, than Snape does for literally abusing and terrorizing children because he couldn’t have Lily Evans. 


Posted on August 13 with 63,884 notes via tehhufflepuffcompanion Reblog

(Source: cafacaesque)


Posted on August 12 with 49,481 notes via the-tenth-will-see-you-now Reblog

fyeahroleplayingrabbit:

Submitted by theripperofnyc


Posted on August 12 with 156 notes via fyeahroleplayingrabbit Reblog

jaegerirl:

fartgallery:

when you die and become a ghost are you forced to wear what you were wearing when you died for eternity or can you go to like Ghost Gap and buy some new ghost clothes

if theres ghost capitalism i swear to fuck ill be so mad


Posted on August 12 with 161,346 notes via summerfinns Reblog